Geological Hazards

Geological Hazards

AGS maps, characterizes, and reports on geological hazards to promote public awareness and assist in public safety efforts. Our work also includes ongoing geotechnical monitoring of Turtle Mountain, the site of the 1903 Frank Slide in Crowsnest Pass, Alberta.



Geological hazards can be subdivided into two groups:

  1. natural geological hazards, where the trigger for a hazardous event or change is provided by a change in the natural environment; and
  2. human-induced hazards, where the trigger for a hazardous event or change is provided by the interaction of human activity in an area with pre-existing natural conditions.

For both sets of geological hazards, our team of engineers, geologists, and technologists describe and map geological hazards by applying their knowledge of the geological materials at the surface and in the subsurface, using advanced analysis techniques like geomechanical modelling and technologies like ground-based interferometric synthetic aperture radar. Our team has developed and maintains the Regional Alberta Observatory for Earthquake Studies (RAVEN) network, an array of seismograph stations, to monitor earthquake activity throughout the province.  

Current Activities